FANDOM


Country summary

Capital

Yamoussoukro

Borders

Burkina Faso 584 km, Ghana 668 km, Guinea 610 km, Liberia 716 km, Mali 532 km

Government type

republic; multiparty presidential regime established 1960

Population

20,617,068[1]

Population growth

2.133% (2010 est.)[1]

Life expectancy

55.45 years[1]

Unemployment

NA[1]

Index of Economic Freedom

123[2]

Corruption Perceptions Index

154[3]

Doing Business ranking

168[4]


Close ties to France since independence in 1960, the development of cocoa production for export, and foreign investment made Cote d'Ivoire (or "Ivory Coast") one of the most prosperous of the West African states, but did not protect it from political turmoil. In December 1999, a military coup - the first ever in Cote d'Ivoire's history - overthrew the government. Junta leader Robert GUEI blatantly rigged elections held in late 2000 and declared himself the winner. Popular protest forced him to step aside and brought Laurent GBAGBO into power. Ivorian dissidents and disaffected members of the military launched a failed coup attempt in September 2002. Rebel forces claimed the northern half of the country, and in January 2003 were granted ministerial positions in a unity government under the auspices of the Linas-Marcoussis Peace Accord. President GBAGBO and rebel forces resumed implementation of the peace accord in December 2003 after a three-month stalemate, but issues that sparked the civil war, such as land reform and grounds for citizenship, remained unresolved. In March 2007 President GBAGBO and former New Force rebel leader Guillaume SORO signed the Ouagadougou Political Agreement. As a result of the agreement, SORO joined GBAGBO's government as Prime Minister and the two agreed to reunite the country by dismantling the zone of confidence separating North from South, integrate rebel forces into the national armed forces, and hold elections. Disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration of rebel forces have been problematic as rebels seek to enter the armed forces. Citizen identification and voter registration pose election difficulties, and balloting planned for November 2009 was postponed with no future date set. Several thousand UN troops and several hundred French remain in Cote d'Ivoire to help the parties implement their commitments and to support the peace process.[1]

Economical characteristicsEdit

  • Currency: West African CFA franc (ISO code: XOF)
  • This country does not seem to have a central bank.
  • Central bank discount rate: 4.75% (31 December 2008)[1]
  • Commercial banks lending rate: NA%[1]
  • Stock of money (M1): $4.242 billion (31 December 2008)[1]
  • Quasi money (with M1 makes M2): $2.117 billion (31 December 2008)[1]


StatisticsEdit

Statistic / Year 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
GDP (million USD)[5] 12 556 10 417 10 545 11 487 13 737 15 481 16 363 17 367 19 796 23 414
Govt. debt (% of GDP)[6] 93.726 96.369
Govt. revenue (% of GDP)[7] 16.933 17.590 12.051 17.625 19.157 18.853
Govt. expenses (% of GDP)[8] 17.364 17.022 16.888 16.228 17.565 17.926
Debt to revenue (years) 5.535 5.479

ReferencesEdit

Note: statistical data was rounded. Different sources may use different methodologies for their estimates. Debt to revenue is calculated by dividing the two variables from their original ('unrounded') values. It represents how long it would a government take to repay its entire debt if it used its whole revenue for this purpose.

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 CIA - The World Facebook. "Cote d'Ivoire", from The World Facebook. Referenced 2010-10-01.
  2. Heritage Foundation. "Cote d'Ivoire", Economic Freedom Score. A lower ranking is better; but please be careful when comparing between different countries or years. Referenced 2010-10-01.
  3. Transparency International. "Cote d'Ivoire", Corruption Perceptions Index 2009. A lower ranking is better; but please note that the numbers cannot be compared between countries or years due to different methodology. Referenced 2010-10-01.
  4. Doing Business. "Cote d'Ivoire", Doing Business 2010 (part of The World Bank Group). A lower ranking is better; but please be careful when comparing between different countries or years. Referenced 2010-10-01.
  5. World Bank. "Cote d'Ivoire: GDP", from World Bank Data. Referenced 2010-10-01.
  6. World Bank. "Cote d'Ivoire: government debt", from World Bank Data. Referenced 2010-10-01.
  7. World Bank. "Cote d'Ivoire: government revenue", from World Bank Data. Referenced 2010-10-01.
  8. World Bank. "Cote d'Ivoire: government expenses", from World Bank Data. Referenced 2010-10-01.

External linksEdit

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